Building a standalone IPA keyboard: Part 2 - The Design

Right, to recap the aims covered in my first post, I want to build a small keypad programmed to type IPA symbols, to supplement my regular QWERTY keyboard.

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How-to: Type IPA symbols on a GNU/Linux system

In the process of doing research for my IPA keypad, I learnt there were more ways of inserting Unicode characters on a GNU/Linux system than I’d realized. As I would have appreciated a quick list of these when learning about the topic, I decided to share the fruits of my labours to save the rest of you some time.

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Building a standalone IPA keyboard: Part 1 - The Prologue

I was talking with a friend the other day about how I insert special characters when typing. Naturally, this is something I do reasonably often. As I was explaining the process, I realized how disorderly my system was. It’s a bit of a mish-mash making do.

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Ten-ten points for creativity

Recently I’ve been travelling around Iwate Prefecture. At Morioka Station I was grabbed by the name of a nearby department store.

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The stick insect insect and the tiger moth moth moth

What’s a stick insect? Easy - an insect that looks like a stick. What’s a tiger moth? Same deal - a moth that looks like a tiger.

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Dial M for… Meridies?

While reading a cracking post about the history of the word entrée on Morph, I did a double take on this image.

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Old wave Japanese

The other day I learnt the Japanese word for ‘reception’ (as in ‘cellphone reception’) - 電波 denpa/dempa. The two kanji that make up this word are 電 den ‘electricity’ and 波 ha ‘wave’. Naturally, its primary meaning is ‘electromagnetic waves’.

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7 free software tools for linguists

Today I’m giving a quick rundown of free software tools for linguistic research. There’s a bit of a preamble, but I’ll get there. Promise.

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Translating Wordsworth's Daffodils through every language on Google Translate

Using Google Translate to generate poetry is something the folks at Language Log and elsewhere have been reporting on for a while.

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Searching for Subtext

Following a recommendation from All Things Linguistic, I’ve recently started listening to a cracking new linguistics podcast called Subtext.

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